Tag Archives: reading on the iPad

Reading aloud is important. That’s why News-O-Matic articles now include a read-aloud feature!

Kids need to be read to!Reading aloud is “the single most important activity for building the knowledge required for eventual success in reading,” according to the landmark 1985 report, “Becoming a Nation of Readers.” It’s been scientifically proven: Reading aloud to kids motivates them to read on their own, promotes language and literacy development, and develops critical thinking.

Reading aloud is a source of motivation.

Providing children with engaging reading content is only part of the job. While some children are able to read autonomously, others have motivation issues — even with great reading resources. Having someone (even a “virtual” voice) read to them can help students focus more fully in their reading experience. The experience mobilizes both the child’s sight and sense of hearing.

Reading aloud enriches the reading experience.

Reading words does not mean that students can recognize them in a discussion. Have you ever thought you knew how a certain word was pronounced only to realize years later that you’ve been mispronouncing it? One purpose of reading aloud is to build children’s awareness of the phonological structure of spoken words. In other words, it helps them learn how words are correctly pronounced.

Reading aloud is not reserved for Kindergarteners

Jim Trelease, the author of the “read aloud Bible” Read-Aloud Handbook, explains an interesting concept: Children listen on a different level than they read! “A child’s reading level doesn’t catch up to his listening level until eighth grade,” Trelease told GreatSchools.net. “You can and should be reading seventh-grade books to fifth-grade kids. They’ll get excited about the plot, which is motivation to keep reading. A fifth-grader can enjoy a more complicated plot than she can read herself, and reading aloud is really going to hook her.”

News-O-Matic, Daily Reading for Kids, now includes a Read Aloud feature in its articles.  

A brand new feature for News-O-Matic

 

It’s been on our mind since the launch of the app. After some research, it became clear that our readers would benefit from this feature. Some of them need to be read to — to help them better understand the information in the articles. Some just enjoy to be read to — to enrich their experience of the news. Adding this feature to our app aligned with our goal of creating an engaging reading experience for kids that would benefit their literacy skills.

This new feature also makes the news available to many additional children, such as English Language Learners (ELL) or children with special needs, reading disorders, or sight impairment. We believe all children should have access to safe, fun daily news. The read aloud feature is one way we can achieve part of this goal. That’s why we created it.        

 Alice Bouis – Marketing Manager- News-O-Matic, The Daily Newspaper Just For Kids

The new version of News-O-Matic is out! Click here to update now!

P4K Recommends: Tips for Reading the Newspaper

Some children find newspapers difficult to read. There is just so much going on! Young readers may wonder: Where do I start? What do I read? How do I know what is important? How long will this take? Overwhelmed, kids often put the newspaper down and walk away forever.

Children shouldn’t shy away from current events. Newspapers help kids become informed citizens and lifelong readers. These simple steps will help any child become a newspaper lover!

kids-reading-paper

Step 1: Skim the Headlines

A headline is the sentence or phrase at the top of an article in a newspaper. It – along with the sub headline – will help kids know a little more about the article.

If a headline intrigues a child, have him or her read the first paragraph or whole article. Make sure they know the story may continue on the inside pages of a printed newspaper.

Step 2: Look at the Pictures

Most articles are accompanied by images. If a child does not understand the headline, have them look at the picture. Photographs tell a story and can give your child many clues to the contents of the article.

Step 3: Pick and Choose

Let children know they do not have to read the entire newspaper! When first reading the newspaper, they can read the stories they find most interesting. As time goes on, you can encourage them to try unfamiliar topics.

Step 4: Ask Questions and Share Ideas

Sometimes a child needs more to feel engaged and stimulated. Ask questions about what they read or share your own thoughts on a news topic.

Step 5: Repeat!

Repeat these steps until your child has read an entire newspaper edition.

These steps are applicable to both print and digital newspapers.

Newspapers on the iPad

 

 

By Gilmarie Brioso