Tag Archives: literacy

The News-O-Matic Impact: Experiencing the World

 

News-O-Matic celebrates its 1,000th edition on Friday, August 26. In order to celebrate, a group of teachers, parents, media experts, and kids contributed essays to describe the impact of News-O-Matic in their world.

Shelly Fryer is an elementary school teacher in Oklahoma.

Shelly Fryer (second from left) and Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (second from right)

Shelly Fryer (second from left) and Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin (second from right)


 

Here’s what she had to say.

I have been using News-O-Matic with my 3rd and 4th grade students for two years. One of my goals as a teacher is to have my students experience the world beyond the walls of our classroom in a way that is interesting for them yet, exposes them to “real” issues. I want students to know that they matter and be able to connect with the stories that they are reading. The news section “Real Jobs” has given my class many opportunities to see jobs that people can do and allow the students to ask questions and be curious.

It even inspired several of our students to interview Governor Fallin when she came to visit our classroom and find out more about what it was like being the Governor of Oklahoma.

One of the ways that I use News-O-Matic in the classroom is to have them read and respond. Students read the articles that interest them and then respond by writing to “Russ” or drawing a picture of what inspires them. It is important for students to be able to connect in a real way and be able to have a voice by responding to what they read. Also, the connected videos and pictures allow students to see and experience the news in a way that makes sense to them.

As a teacher I appreciate that News-O-Matic is sensitive to the things that may be upsetting in the news, and use a Child Psychologist to make sure that the students are informed but not frightened by the current news. Students want to know about what is going on in the world, but it is also very important that they know that they are safe.

News-O-Matic has made a real difference in my classroom. Having current and engaging content which encourages students to “experience” the world around them and then have the ability to respond in a real way allows students to feel like they matter, and that their views and opinions are heard.

Students at Oklahoma's Positive Tomorrows speak with Governor Fallin

Students at Oklahoma’s Positive Tomorrows speak with Governor Fallin

P4K Recommends: Tips for Reading the Newspaper

Some children find newspapers difficult to read. There is just so much going on! Young readers may wonder: Where do I start? What do I read? How do I know what is important? How long will this take? Overwhelmed, kids often put the newspaper down and walk away forever.

Children shouldn’t shy away from current events. Newspapers help kids become informed citizens and lifelong readers. These simple steps will help any child become a newspaper lover!

kids-reading-paper

Step 1: Skim the Headlines

A headline is the sentence or phrase at the top of an article in a newspaper. It – along with the sub headline – will help kids know a little more about the article.

If a headline intrigues a child, have him or her read the first paragraph or whole article. Make sure they know the story may continue on the inside pages of a printed newspaper.

Step 2: Look at the Pictures

Most articles are accompanied by images. If a child does not understand the headline, have them look at the picture. Photographs tell a story and can give your child many clues to the contents of the article.

Step 3: Pick and Choose

Let children know they do not have to read the entire newspaper! When first reading the newspaper, they can read the stories they find most interesting. As time goes on, you can encourage them to try unfamiliar topics.

Step 4: Ask Questions and Share Ideas

Sometimes a child needs more to feel engaged and stimulated. Ask questions about what they read or share your own thoughts on a news topic.

Step 5: Repeat!

Repeat these steps until your child has read an entire newspaper edition.

These steps are applicable to both print and digital newspapers.

Newspapers on the iPad

 

 

By Gilmarie Brioso